2014 Suzuki KingQuad 750

Suzuki’s KingQuad 750 Power Steering has some serious engine updates for 2014. A new twin-plug cylinder head, an improved engine management system and a new exhaust were added to maintain the 750’s performance while meeting stricter emission limits. We put one of the new 750s through a full test to see if it performs as well or better than before.

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HOW DOES THE PRICE COMPARE?

The KingQuad 750 Power Steering starts at $9499. The Matte Gray Limited Edition is $9899, and the camo model is $9999. There’s also a KingQuad 750 without power steering for $8899. Yamaha’s Grizzly 700 EPS starts at $9499. Kawasaki’s Brute Force 750 EPS and the Polaris Sportsman XP 850 EPS sell for the same $9999.

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WHAT POWERS IT?
The biggest single-cylinder ATV engine in the game. The piston is more than 4 inches wide! The Suzuki has 722cc, two cams, four valves and fuel injection. You might not expect a giant single to be smooth, but the KingQuad is, thanks to dual counterbalancers and rubbercushioned engine mounts. It throbs at idle, but it’s outstandingly smooth on the move.
For more efficient combustion, the 2014 model’s cylinder head has two spark plugs instead of one, new cams, an injector with more holes for finer fuel spray, and air injection. There’s also a new exhaust system with a catalytic converter and a new engine management system with slip control logic, a system that monitors ignition timing for increased traction on loose or slippery surfaces.

WHAT IS THE TRANSMISSION LIKE?

It’s a fully automatic, dual-range, continuously variable, belt-type transmission, the kind most 4×4 ATVs use, but there are some important differences. The Suzuki’s CVT has a centrifugal clutch before the primary clutch, which protects the drive belt. The KingQuad’s range selector is also smoother and more positive than most.

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WHAT KIND OF 4WD SYSTEM DOES IT HAVE?

Selectable 2WD/4WD with a lockable front differential. On the Suzuki, you lock the front differential with a lever on the 2WD/4WD selector switch on the handlebar. Locking the front differential means a big increase in steering effort on some quads, but the Suzuki’s power steering takes care of that.

HOW POWERFUL IS IT?
Suzuki says the extensive engine modifications make the new KingQuadn750 match the previous model’s performance and meet the stricter 2014 emissions limits. We’re not going to smog test the Suzuki, but we can tell you it runs as strong as ever, possibly better. To us, the new 750 feels more responsive than the 2013. The difference isn’t huge, but we’d say the power builds quicker. Unfortunately, we didn’t have a 2013 to confirm what we felt.

When it comes to the sheer amount of power, the 750 makes you feel like a lottery winner at the store—you have enough for anything you see, with tons in reserve. If you ever wonder if a bigbore ATV is really worth it, the 750’s rush of acceleration settles the issue. If you have work to do, the big Suzuki gives you the ability to tow or push massive weight effortlessly.

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HOW IS THE POWER ON THE TRAIL?

It’s a fun combination of tractor torque and muscle-quad acceleration. The Suzuki’s power delivery isn’t as instant and solid as a Kawasaki Brute Force 750, but its throttle response is clean and quick. There’s plenty of power available for steep climbs, even in tight trail situations where there’s no space to build momentum or revs. It will wheelie when you want it to, and you can feed the power to the ground smoothly to maintain traction in technical situations.

The engine management system’s slip control logic doesn’t detract from the fun of playing with the 750’s power. You can powerslide the machine around turns, or roost your buddies at will if you want to. We purposely looked for slick conditions to feel the slip control logic working, but we couldn’t detect a difference between the new KingQuad and others we’ve ridden.

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WHAT KIND OF SUSPENSION DOES IT COME WITH?

There are double A-arms up front and A-arms and control arms with a sway bar in the rear. The front and rear shocks are spring preload adjustable. Like other Japanese ATV manufacturers, Suzuki uses semi-long travel suspension to limit body roll. There’s 6.7 inches of movement up front and 7.7 inches in the rear.

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HOW WELL DOES THE SUSPENSION WORK?

The KingQuad’s suspension is tuned for comfort at a reasonable trail-riding pace, and it does a great job at that. We motored through lots of seriously chewed-up terrain, and the suspension took the beating while we enjoyed the ride. The Suzuki’s suspension handles high-speed riding well, too, but big bumps bottom it more often than machines with more travel.

IS SUZUKI’S POWER STEERING WORTH THE EXTRA DOUGH?

Yes. Electronic Power Steering (EPS) is a $600 option on the KingQuad 750, but it doesn’t only lighten the steering effort; EPS also makes the Suzuki smoother on punishing trails because it dampens some of the kick that comes through the steering as the wheels hit rocks and slam through ruts. Suzuki’s power steering also provides good steering feel; it’s not over-assisted.

HOW DOES IT HANDLE?
It’s nimble for a big-bore 4×4. As on most machines with independent rear suspension, there’s a fair amount of body roll, but the Suzuki has an easy, surefooted feel on twisty trails, and it’s calm and stable on faster open terrain and dirt roads.

Like other big-bore 4x4s, the KingQuad is roomy, but its overall dimensions aren’t as huge as some, which makes it easier to maneuver, especially in tight conditions. At 672 pounds full of fuel, the 750 is light compared to big 4x4s from Arctic Cat, Polaris and Can-Am, which weigh almost 100 pounds more. The lack of heft definitely does good things for the Suzuki’s handling and feel.

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HOW IS IT IN WATER AND MUD?

The KingQuad is ready for the worst deep water and mud, but its tires are more at home on hard ground. The 750 pulls hard enough to slog through deep mud bogs, and the locking front differential makes sure all the power gets to the wheels. The all-terrain Duro tires on the 750 give away quite a bit of grip and momentum in slick, sloppy mud. Fortunately, there are a vast number of more aggressive aftermarket tires available from companies like AMS, High Lifter, CST, GMZ, Maxxis, Slasher and ITP. A rev limiter cuts in around 20 mph when the front diff is locked, but you can let the engine wind out in standard 4WD mode.

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HOW DOES IT HANDLE HILLS?
The KingQuad 750 can be the king of almost any hill you choose. As long as the tires can find traction, the Suzuki has the power and balance to conquer climbs that will scare most riders away. With the front differential locked, the Suzuki claws its way up rocky, hardpacked hills with amazing security. Good brakes and smooth, predictable engine braking make motoring back down hills stress-free. The sealed, oil-cooled rear brake lacks the feel and power of good hydraulic discs, but it slows the machine adequately and lasts almost forever.

HOW ARE THE DETAILS?

Only one needs work. The Suzuki didn’t use a bit of oil during our test, but checking the oil is a hassle. You have to remove a panel held by three of those annoying plastic pins just to get to the dipstick.

All the other details are excellent. The seat and the ergonomics in general are spot-on. The shift lever’s feel is as slick as they come. The muffler isn’t just stainless; it’s polished stainless, and it sounds really good. Speaking of sounds, the Suzuki engine, transmission and driveline are very mechanically quiet. There are two good-sized storage compartments—one on the front fender and one beside the taillight. There’s a handlebar-mounted headlight in addition to the two main headlights, and you can switch it off to cut glare if you have something on the front rack.

WHAT IS OUR FINAL ANSWER?
The new KingQuad 750 is just as fast, powerful and tractable as ever. The real beauty of the Suzuki is the entire machine is as well thought out and impressive as the engine. The KingQuad 750 is very comfortable, handles well and is outstandingly refined.

SPECS
SUZUKI KINGQUAD 750 POWER STEERING
ENGINE/TRANSMISSION

Engine type ….Liquid-cooled, DOHC, 4-valve, 4-stroke
Displacement ………………………………………..722cc
Bore x stroke …………………………..104mm x 85mm
Compression ratio ………………………………… 10.0:1
Lubrication system …………………………… Wet sump
Fuel metering …………………………………………….EFI
Starting/back-up …………………………….Electric/none
Starting procedure …………..In neutral or any gear w/
brake engaed
Choke ……………………………………………………..N/A
Air filter access …………… Remove seat, two clips on
airbox cover and wingnut on filter
Transmission ……. Fully automatic, dual-range CVT w/
reverse and engine braking
Reverse procedure………. Move range selector to “R”
Drive system ………Selectable 2WD/4WD w/ lockable
front differential
Final drives f/r ………………………………….Shaft/shaft
DIMENSIONS/CAPACITIES/WEIGHTS
Fuel capacity ……………………………………….4.6 gal.
Wheelbase ……………………………………………. 50.6”
Overall length/width/height ……………83.3”/47.6”/49”
Seat height …………………………………………… 36.2”
Ground clearance ……………………………………. 10.2”
Wet weight ………………………………………….672 lb.
Rack weight limits f/r ……………………. 66 lb./132 lb.
Hitch ………………………………………………………Yes
Towing limit………………………………………..1250 lb.
ROLLING CHASSIS
Frame ……………………………………Round steel tube
Suspension/wheel travel:
Front ………………………………..Double A-arms/6.7”
Rear ………………………………. A-arms, J-arms/7.7”
Brakes/actuation:
Front ………………… Hydraulic discs/right hand lever
Rear .. Cable operated, sealed, oil-bathed multi-disc/
left-hand lever, right-foot pedal
Parking brake ……. Lever lock on left hand brake lever
Tires:
Front ……………………………25×8-12 Duro DI-K114
Rear …………………………..25×10-12 Duro DI-K514
ELECTRICAL
DC outlet ………….. Waterproof automotive-style plug
Lighting
Front ………… Two 30W fender mounted headlights,
one 40W handlebar-mounted headlight
Rear ………………………………. Single tail/brake light
DETAILS
Instruments .Speedometer, odometer, trip odometer,
hour meter, fuel gauge, clock
Colors ………………………………………….. Red, green
Minimum recommended operator age ……………… 16
Suggested retail price ……………………………. $9499
Contact ………………………… Suzuki, (800) 828-RIDE

RATINGS
MOTOR/TRANNY

Overall power ……………………………. 5
Low …………………………………….. 5
Mid …………………………………….. 5
Top …………………………………….. 5
Throttle response ……………………….. 5
Idling smoothness ………………………. 4
Shifting/tranny …………………………… 5
HANDLING AND CHASSIS
Overall handling………………………….. 4
Turning precision………………………… 4
Turning stability …………………………. 4
Powersliding ……………………………… 4
Steering ease ……………………………. 5
Off-cambers ……………………………… 4
High-speed stability …………………….. 4
Jumping …………………………………… 4
Brakes: f ………………………………….. 4
Brakes: r ………………………………….. 4
Suspension: f …………………………….. 4
Suspension: r ……………………………. 4
Low-speed ride plushness …………….. 5
High-speed bump control ……………… 4
Ground clearance ……………………….. 5
Undercarriage protection ……………… 5
Traction …………………………………… 4
Hill-climbing ………………………………. 5
Downhilling ……………………………….. 5
Water/mud……………………………….. 4
Rock hounding……………………………. 5
RIDER COMFORT AND CONVENIENCE
Overall ease of use ……………………… 5
Startup ease …………………………….. 5
Seat comfort …………………………….. 5
Vibration ………………………………….. 5
Bars/seat/footrest location……………. 5
Mud/water fender protection …………. 5
Air filter access …………………………. 4
Choke access…………………………..N/A
Handlebar control ease ………………… 5
Range selection ease …………………… 5
Storage box size ………………………… 5
Storage box access …………………….. 5
Front rack space ………………………… 5
Rear rack space …………………………. 5
OVERALL
Overall design ……………………………. 5
Fit and finish ……………………………… 5
Overall sport …………………………….. 4
Overall utility …………………………….. 5
Overall rating …………………………….. 5

HIGHS:
• Big-bore power
• Light, easy handling for a large 4×4
• Quiet, refined engine, transmission
and driveline
• “Perfect Fit” ergonomics
LOWS:
• The stock tires hold the machine
back in mud.
SUZUKI SPECIAL OFFERS AVAILABLE AT PRESS TIME
• 0% financing for 60 months

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