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INSTALL A CVT TEMP GAUGE

May 17, 2017
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Aside from Yamaha YXZ1000Rs and Honda Pioneers, every UTV transfers power to the ground via a Continuously Variable Transmission (CVT). Think of the front and rear sprockets on an ATV or dirt bike connected by the chain; hill-climbers have tiny front and huge rear sprockets for torque, while desert racers have larger front and smaller rear sprockets for top speed. CVTs give us both scenarios with two variable-diameter sheaves connected by a belt. While CVT technology is getting better all of the time and belts are getting stronger, we still blow a belt occasionally. We’ve even overheated and thrown belts on long downhills and had others shred for who-knows-what reasons. It doesn’t take much abuse to hurt a belt, but, luckily, abuse can be detected, as friction produces heat. When the belt slips, it gets hotter, and Trail Tech introduces a CVT temp gauge kit to help us monitor and manage belt temperatures. We installed Trail Tech’s CVT temp gauge kit in our Polaris RZR XP 1000 Gold Matte Metallic LE, and here’s how we did it.

Loosen the hose clamps, remove the CVT cooling duct and loosen the intake plenum hose clamp. Remove the hose from the plenum and stuff a clean rag in the port. Remove the engine-access panel in the bed. Drill a 15/64-inch (5mm) hole in the exhaust duct area of your CVT cover.
Loosen the hose clamps, remove the CVT cooling duct and loosen the intake plenum hose clamp. Remove the hose from the plenum and stuff a clean rag in the port. Remove the engine-access panel in the bed. Drill a 15/64-inch (5mm) hole in the exhaust duct area of your CVT cover.

 

We didn’t have a M6x10 die, so we simply threaded the Trail Tech sensor into the plastic CVT cover. Remove the outer CVT cover and thread the sensor in with a 10mm wrench. Anchor with silicone seal bead.
We didn’t have a M6x10 die, so we simply threaded the Trail Tech sensor into the plastic CVT cover. Remove the outer CVT cover and thread the sensor in with a 10mm wrench. Anchor with silicone seal bead.

 

The sensor should be less than an inch from the CVT belt. Throwing a belt will take out the sensor if it’s directly over the belt, so offset the hole to either side. Remove plastic shards and replace the CVT outer cover and ducts, being sure to remove the rag. Zip-tie the sensor wire and extension as you route them up the driveline tunnel.
The sensor should be less than an inch from the CVT belt. Throwing a belt will take out the sensor if it’s directly over the belt, so offset the hole to either side. Remove plastic shards and replace the CVT outer cover and ducts, being sure to remove the rag. Zip-tie the sensor wire and extension as you route them up the driveline tunnel.

 

Replace the bed access panel. Remove the seats, driveline console plastic rivets and Torx fasteners, and route the sensor extension out the front of the tunnel. Zip-tie the wire away from the driveshaft as you go; we used the OEM wiring loom as a guide.
Replace the bed access panel. Remove the seats, driveline console plastic rivets and Torx fasteners, and route the sensor extension out the front of the tunnel. Zip-tie the wire away from the driveshaft as you go; we used the OEM wiring loom as a guide.

 

Remove the hood panel and unbolt the dash. In the “firewall,” this large grommet is split to accept accessory wiring. Run the sensor wire through the slit and attach to the Trail Tech temp gauge.
Remove the hood panel and unbolt the dash. In the “firewall,” this large grommet is split to accept accessory wiring. Run the sensor wire through the slit and attach to the Trail Tech temp gauge.

 

Decide where you want to place the gauge. We used the kit’s two-sided tape to mount ours, because we didn’t want to drill holes in our loan unit’s dash. You may want to secure it permanently with two M4 (#6) screws (not included). Zip-tie the excess sensor wire under the dash and replace the dash and hood panel.
Decide where you want to place the gauge. We used the kit’s two-sided tape to mount ours, because we didn’t want to drill holes in our loan unit’s dash. You may want to secure it permanently with two M4 (#6) screws (not included). Zip-tie the excess sensor wire under the dash and replace the dash and hood panel.

 

Replace the tunnel/console cover and refasten with Torx screws and two-piece Polaris rivets. Replace the rear access panel and seats. Set the temp gauge to the desired “high-temperature alert” setting and you’re ready to rock. ❏
Replace the tunnel/console cover and refasten with Torx screws and two-piece Polaris rivets. Replace the rear access panel and seats. Set the temp gauge to the desired “high-temperature alert” setting and you’re ready to rock.

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