MASSIMO T-BOSS 750

Massimo Motors has expanded its line of UTVs with new Warriors, including the Warrior MXU with heat and air conditioning tested in our December 2019 issue. We’ll be testing the all-new Warrior 1000 MXU Crew soon, and Massimo also has an all-new T-Boss 750 for 2020. It delivers 42 horsepower at a price equal to the Polaris Ranger full-size 570, and it has a lot more standard features than the Ranger. Massimo also introduces the 750X Golf, which replaces the tilt bed with rear-facing seats for getting a foursome to the next hole quickly. Here’s the T-Boss 750 for your zooting pleasure.

The T-Boss 750 is Massimo’s sportiest UTV to date, and the top speed is 52 mph, equal to the Teryx 800FI. It delivers a lot of bang for the buck at $10,499.

HOW DOES COST COMPARE?

The T-Boss 750 is $10,499, while the 550F is $9,499. Cub Cadet’s Challenger MX 750 is $12,699. Hisun’s Sector 750 EPS is $11,499. The Polaris Ranger 570 is $10,199, and the full-size 570 is $10,499. The Ranger 1000 is $12,999. Can-am’s Defender HD8 starts at $12,199. Massimo also has the more utility-styled T-Boss 500 for $7,999 and the T-Boss 410X for $6,799.

The tilt steering wheel is nice, as are the turn-signal toggle, parking brake, passenger grab bar and dash with lots of storage space. The split windshield can be tilted out to let in fresh air.

WHAT EXTRAS ARE STANDARD EQUIPMENT?

The T-Boss 750 comes with EPS, a roof, 4,500-pound winch, two-tone color-matched aluminum wheels, folding windshield, side mirrors, turn signals, nerf bars, parking brake, side nets, LED headlights and taillights, 2-inch receiver, and camo bodywork if you want it. The T-Boss 750 also has a center console that folds down for an armrest and cup holders when carrying one or less passengers.

Like a Yamaha Rhino, the 694cc EFI single has a 102mm piston on an 85mm stroke. The spin-on oil filter is a nice touch, but the CVT’s Low range is a bit high for our taste.

HOW IS THE T-BOSS POWER?

It’s peppy! The 694cc single has decent acceleration, but not what we call yank. It will drift into corners and carry the slide on looser surfaces, but not when there is a lot of traction. We got 52 mph out of it, which is more than any Yamaha Rhino.

WHAT ABOUT THE DELIVERY?

It’s smooth. EFI and CVT response are paired well, so it’s easy to modulate in difficult terrain. Low range is pretty high, and the dash-mounted range selector is slick. The T-Boss has the exact 2WD/4WD/diff-lock switch as a Yamaha Rhino, plus an unlocking rear diff. It has great compression braking for hills and setting up drifts.

Massimo’s new T-Boss 750 comes in seven colors, including camouflage, and the 42-horsepower single has plenty of power for fun on the trail. It comes with standard features not found on many special-edition UTVs.

HOW DOES THE T-BOSS HANDLE?

It’s agile yet predictable. The short 72-inch wheelbase and great EPS assist make it snake through tight turns, and it’s pretty stable at speed. It’s only 57 inches wide, so you can’t slam it into turns like you would a 60- or 64-inch UTV or it will bicycle. The 27-inch Sun-F tires are like Bighorn 2.0s and deliver decent traction.

WHAT ABOUT THE SUSPENSION?

It’s tuned pretty well. There is only 8.5 inches of travel, which is more than a Rhino and about equal with the Teryx 800 in action. It delivers a decent ride quality on trail garbage and is fairly resistant to bottoming. The shocks are only preload adjustable, and there is no torsion bar, front or rear.

With one or two people aboard, the 750’s center console folds down for a padded armrest with two cup holders. Two magnets hold it up when not in use.

HOW IS IT IN MUD AND ROCKS?

It’s capable in both. The locking front diff helps it claw through, but it high-centers in mud ruts deeper than 10 inches. The fenders protect well, but there are no doors to keep flung mud out. Rocks are a better fit, as the T-Boss has plenty of torque and traction for most obstacles. The A-arm front and rear guards help it slide over rocks, and the nerf bars protect the bodywork.

The seat bottom lifts out for access to the engine and CVT ducting, Donaldson-style air filter and CVT cover. The 750’s intake ducts are routed to behind the cabin at hip level.

HOW STRONG ARE THE BRAKES?

Pretty strong. Dual-piston front and single-piston rear calipers squeeze perforated rotors, so they’re steady in mud and water. The brakes are backed by great compression braking and a dash-mounted parking brake.

Sand is a new color choice and a welcome addition. LED headlights are new, and there are blanks in the bodywork for a second pair, like later Teryx 800s. The split windscreen, roof, winch, front bumper, mirrors and turn signals are all standard.

WHAT ABOUT CREATURE COMFORTS?

There are plenty. The bench seat is comfortable for one to three people, and the center console is held up by magnets. The tilt steering wheel has over-molding, texture and thumb nubs. It tilts and has a stiff dampener cylinder, but it flexes some on big bumps. The digital dash is nice and tilts with the wheel. It has an analog tachometer needle and digital speedo and parameter readouts. The 750 has side nets and shoulder bolsters, and the nets use seat-belt latches for quick entrance and egress. The passenger panic bar is sculpted and over-molded as well. The glove box is large, and there are three more cubby holes, with one for radios and such. There are also five blanks for accessory switches.

Width is 57 inches, ground clearance is 10 inches and travel is 8.5 inches. The bed holds 400 pounds of cargo and has tilt-assist gas lifts. LED taillights and holes along the bed rails are new. The 750 will tow 1,500 pounds via the 2-inch receiver.

WHAT IS OUR FINAL ANSWER?

While there are a lot of UTVs with more power, suspension and top speed, the fact is that not everyone is willing to pay $25,000 or more to get down the trail to their favorite fishing hole or hunting camp. The Massimo T-Boss 750 has a lot of standard features at a lower price than its competition, and it is a very capable trail machine that is street-legal in many states. It does everything pretty well and gives a lot of bang for the buck. Massimo even has a line of 12-volt E-coolers for the bed, starting at less than $300. 

SPECS:

MASSIMO T-BOSS 750

ENGINE/TRANSMISSION

Engine type Single cylinder, liquid cooled, 4-valve,

OHC, 4-stroke

Displacement 694cc

Bore x stroke 102mm x 85mm

Compression ratio 10.2:1

Lubrication system Wet sump

Additional cooling Auto fan

Induction EFI

Starting/back-up Electric/none

Starting procedure Turn ignition key

Choke location N/A

Air filter:

  Type Fabric pre-filter and pleated paper filter

Access Tool-less, tilt seat forward and undo 4 clips

Transmission Dual-range CVT w/reverse

Reverse procedure Move range selector to “R”

Drive system Selectable 2WD/4WD w/front and

rear diff-lock

Final drives Shafts

DIMENSIONS/CAPACITIES/WEIGHTS

Fuel capacity 6.9 gal.

Wheelbase 72”

Overall length/width/height 103.5”/57”/77.5”

Ground clearance 10”

Dry weight 999 lb.

Bed weight limit 400 lb.

Hitch 2” receiver

Towing limit 1,500 lb.

ROLLING CHASSIS

Frame Steel round tube

Suspension/wheel travel:

  Front Dual A-arms w/preload adjustable shocks/8.5”

  Rear Dual A-arms w/preload adjustable shocks/8.5”

Brakes/actuation:

  Front Hydraulic discs/left-side pedal

  Rear Hydraulic discs/left-side pedal

Parking Lever on console

Tires:

  Front 27×9-14

  Rear 27×11-14

ELECTRICAL

DC outlet Console

Lighting:

  Front 2 35W headlights

  Rear LED brake/tail light

DETAILS

Instrumentation Analog & LCD digital multimeter

Colors Blue, red, white, green, orange, sand, camo

Minimum recommended operator age 16

Suggested retail price $10,499

Contact Massimo, (877) 881-6376,

www.massimomotor.com

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