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POLARIS GENERAL HOP-UPS

March 15, 2017
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As you read in the UTV Action UTV Awards (see page 44), Polaris scored a basesloaded home run with the radical crossover General 1000 EPS and new-for-2017 General 4 1000 EPS. The 100-horsepower Generals combine RZR and Ranger DNA to bring recreation/utility UTVs up to sport-level performance. Basically a RZR S 1000 with a next-generation Ranger/RZR cabin, the General has 12.25 inches of front and 13.2 inches of rear travel with front and rear torsion bars. We got to try two longtravel Generals this past summer in Utah, and the rock-crawling capabilities were astounding, with EBS and a 37-mph low range. But, not many General owners want to widen their 60-inch 1000 to 70-plus inches or spend $5999 on a long-travel kit. So, we met with Walker Evans Racing for some shock testing after PRP Seats had developed storage bags and seats for our General 1000 Premium. After WER and PRP were done, we had some serious ride quality, elevating our five-star General to the Joint Chiefs of Staff. HMF Racing also has slip-on, full-system exhausts and more for the General.

While Velocity-series shocks for RZRs have high- and low-speed compression adjusters, these WER General shocks have a single compression adjustment with 16 positions and a large adjuster knob. The Velocity costs $900 each, while the General needle shocks are going to be around $577 (2.0) to $677.93 (2.5) each.
While Velocity-series shocks for RZRs have high- and low-speed compression adjusters, these WER General shocks have a single compression adjustment with 16 positions and a large adjuster knob. The Velocity costs $900 each, while the General needle shocks are going to be around $577 (2.0) to $677.93 (2.5) each.

BIG AND BIGGER VELOCITIES
As good as the General’s ride quality is in stock form, the $15,599 Base EPS and $17,499 Premium EPS come with preload-adjustable high-pressure gas (HPG) shocks, while the $19,999 Deluxe EPS comes with Fox adjustable-piggyback QS3 shocks. QS3s only have three-position compression damping adjusters, so there is a lot more performance available with aftermarket shocks. Walker Evans Racing is all over the Polaris General, as WER developed the OEM shocks for the 2017 General 4 (see “Inside Scoop” July 2016) and has two Velocity-series options in the works for Generals—2.0 and 2.5 stepped-needle, dropped-piggyback WERs with compression adjusters. By placing the piggyback reservoirs lower on the shock bodies, Walker Evans incorporates bypass technology from the Velocity Series to deliver greater bottoming resistance with a plusher, more progressive damping curve. Once the shock piston passes the reservoir, it cuts off the reservoir valving and gets firmer as the needle goes further into its seat to prevent bottoming.

WER maintained the stock General ride height of 11.75 inches front and 11.25 inches rear set on a mat. We settled on 300-/350-pound dual-rate Eibach springs for the most balanced ride. WER is also working on front Walker Links for the General, but the rear torsion-bar links are too short.
WER maintained the stock General ride height of 11.75 inches front and 11.25 inches rear set on a mat. We settled on 300-/350-pound dual-rate Eibach springs for the most balanced ride. WER is also working on front Walker Links for the General, but the rear torsion-bar links are too short.

We set up a course at Hungry Valley SVRA that had plenty of whoops, sand turns, hills, ridge lines, off-cambers, rain ruts and rocks, and, after WER’s Reid Nordin checked the OEM ride heights, we turned some laps to get the feel of the stock General’s suspension. Our Premium General bucked in whoops and had a harsh ride on rocks and in ruts, but it was really good on offcambers.

Front WER 2.0s were fitted with 175-pound main springs, and cross-overs were set at 1.5 inches from the preload rings. Although overall spring rates are softer than stock, the 2.0s are harder to bottom, yet the ride is much more plush.
Front WER 2.0s were fitted with 175-pound main springs, and cross-overs were set at 1.5 inches from the preload rings. Although overall spring rates are softer than stock, the 2.0s are harder to bottom, yet the ride is much more plush.

First, we tried a set of Velocity 2.0s with dual springs and cross-overs. Fronts were fitted with 175-pound main springs, and the rears had 350-pound springs. Compression adjusters were set at 8 out (of 16), and the cross-over rings were set at 1.5 inches. We ran a few laps and saw a huge improvement in plushness and ride quality, but there was still some bucking in the whoops. So, Reid went to a softer 300/350 rear spring to balance the ride and increase whoop speeds even further. WER is developing the High Performance 2.0s for General owners who want to upgrade from the HPG or Fox QS3 shocks with stock suspension arms, while the Velocity 2.5s are for those interested in a long-travel kit. We switched to the 2.5 shocks with identical spring rates and cross-overs and cut some more hot laps. The ride with the 2.5s was awesome; we could float over whoops at much higher speeds and with more control, and the shocks soaked up rocks and ruts with ease. While Velocities for RZR XPs have high- and low-speed compression adjusters, General High Performances have low-speed only to keep costs down to $677.93 per shock.

PRP makes GT/SE and XC suspension seats for the General for $425 each. GT/SEs have 7 inches of containment pocket for a more secure, comfortable ride, while XCs have less bolster for a more open feel. Upgraded suspension and suspension seats give the General a limo-like ride.
PRP makes GT/SE and XC suspension seats for the General for $425 each. GT/SEs have 7 inches of containment pocket for a more secure, comfortable ride, while XCs have less bolster for a more open feel. Upgraded suspension and suspension seats give the General a limo-like ride.

PRP SEATS AND STORAGE
PRP Seats makes cool bags that fit in the console tunnel under the General’s cup holders. The centerconsole bag has zippers on both sides, piping to match the General’s trim and hook-and-loop mounting with onesided tape anchoring it to the console. It’s $55. There is also a PRP center bag for the space between the seats with a mesh front pocket, large main compartment and heavy-duty zipper. It starts at $55. PRP’s rear double bag has three hook-and-loop closures that mount to the harness bar and two large main compartments for spare belts, tools, a first-aid kit and/or rain suit(s). It starts at $85 and can be customized. PRP is also developing a soft vinyl top for the General for $199.00 with colors to match trim packages. PRP’s seats start at $425.00 each for the GT/SE and XC lines with color-matched panels and piping.

While the General’s console hole looks cool, it’s wasted space. PRP’s console bag ($55) turns the gap into extra storage space. It’s made of tough, vinylcoated nylon and marine-grade nylon with new rubberized, quiet zippers.
While the General’s console hole looks cool, it’s wasted space. PRP’s console bag ($55) turns the gap into extra storage space. It’s made of tough, vinylcoated nylon and marine-grade nylon with new rubberized, quiet zippers.
Our General has PRP’s rear double bag ($85), but PRP has since built this full-length utility storage bag for jackets and other light cargo for $79.
Our General has PRP’s rear double bag ($85), but PRP has since built this full-length utility storage bag for jackets and other light cargo for $79.

General owners have two new shock upgrade options for under $2700, as WER makes the new General 1000 ride like a high-end RZR XP on whoops and float like a magic carpet over trail garbage. PRP has the seats and storage options to boost ride quality in the cabin as well.

HMF Racing has a slip-on Titan-series exhaust for the General and RZR 1000 that weighs 17 pounds and boosts midrange performance. It’s $399.95, while the full-system, dual-canister Performance exhaust is $894.95.
HMF Racing has a slip-on Titan-series exhaust for the General and RZR 1000 that weighs 17 pounds and boosts midrange performance. It’s $399.95, while the full-system, dual-canister Performance exhaust is $894.95.

HMF EXHAUST AND ACCESSORIES
HMF Racing’s Titan QS-series Blackout exhaust cleans up the rear of the General, adds torque and decreases weight by 6 pounds with the Quiet Core (84-decibel) insert, all for $399.95. Or, go a little louder (88dB) and get more power by trading the insert for a Fuel Optimizer. HMF also has a full system dual-canister Performance exhaust with six color choices and 10 end-cap options starting at $894.95. HMF Racing also makes Defender front ($449.95) and rear ($239.95) bumpers for the General 1000 and 1000 4.

Walker Evans Racing is developing 2.0 and 2.5 needle shocks for the Polars General 1000, and we got a chance to try out prototypes on our Premium. Ride quality and bottoming resistance were greatly improved, and cost will be lower than WER’s high-end Velocity VS2. Five shocks for RZRs.
Walker Evans Racing is developing 2.0 and 2.5 needle shocks for the Polars General 1000, and we got a chance to try out prototypes on our Premium. Ride quality and bottoming resistance were greatly improved, and cost will be lower than WER’s high-end Velocity VS2. Five shocks for RZRs.

CONTACTS
HMF Racing
5111 West 164th Street
Brookpark, OH 44142
(216) 631-6980
www.hmfracing.com

PRP Seats
27555 Commerce Center Dr.
Temecula, CA 92590
(800) 317-6253
www.prpseats.com

Walker Evans Racing
2304 Fleetwood Drive
Riverside, CA 92509
(951) 784-7223
(888) WEE-RACE
www.walkerevansracing.com

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