POLARIS RZR TRAIL 900 PREMIUM

Original RZR roots with Turbo S amenities

POLARIS RZR TRAIL 900 PREMIUM

The original RZR 800 was a 50-inch trail machine, and it’s great to see the 50 inch Polaris RZR Trail 900 Premium still available as it breaks new ground with the its four-cylinder, 2-liter Pro R. The RZR Trail lets you experience the thousands of miles of U.S. Forest Service and state 50-inch trails across the nation, and the 2022 version even has more elbow and leg room than the original 800. It’s a lot more refined and faster, too. We got a chance to experience the 2022 RZR Trail 900 Ultimate at ERX Park’s woods course.

WHAT’S NEW FOR 2022?

Trail and Trail S models got the RZR Turbo S styling with aggressive front fascia, hood, doors, fenders and dash, along with a wider cabin for more elbow room with a 2021 1/2 remodel. Cabins and beds are protected by new ROPS cages, and the roomier cabins have new ergonomic seats and smaller D-shaped steering wheels moved closer to the driver. The driver’s seat adjusts tool-lessly, while passenger seats require tools for fitment. Trails come in Sport, Premium and Ultimate trim levels, and all three models include half doors with tubular frames and new rubber seals for a cleaner ride.

POLARIS RZR TRAIL 900 PREMIUM
All Trails have a 75-horsepower, 875cc ProStar twin engine fed by a 46mm EFI throttle body, and the 93mm pistons have 10.6:1 compression. Only the Trail and Trail S models have an Engine Braking System helix in the CVT, and only the Trail Premiums and Ultimates have the unlocking Versa-Trak rear diff.

 

Trails have a 75-horsepower 875cc ProStar twin engine with engine braking and Turf-mode rear diff, and so does the Trail S Sport. Neither the 50-inch nor 60-inch Sport have electronic power steering, but the Premiums and Ultimates do have variable-assist EPS. Premiums and Ultimates also have blacked-out, 55-watt LED headlights, while Sports have standard 55-watt halogens. All have the Turbo S LED accents around the grill. The Trails have 10 inches of travel all around with ZF Sachs front and ZF Twin-Tube Sachs rear shocks, along with front and rear sway bars and 26×12-inch PXT tires. The Sports have steel wheels, while Premiums and Ultimates have aluminum rims.

POLARIS RZR TRAIL 900 PREMIUM
The Polaris RZR Trail 900 Premium has a large pleated-paper air filter and still airbox to draw air from shoulder level and behind the cabin. A removable bed panel gives quick access to the filter, spark plugs and oil-fill cap.

 

Ultimates feature Polaris’ Ride Command with 7-inch digital touchscreen display with built-in GPS and GPS topographies and trails, Group Ride cell- and non-cell communications, Bluetooth and USB smartphone connectivity, AM/FM/weather radio, in-vehicle comms with optional Sena headsets, and several customizable screens, including a backup camera and audio for the Rockford Fosgate Stage 2 audio system. This is in addition to the 4-inch LCD rider information center with dual-sweep analog speedo and tach dials over the tilt steering wheel. Only Ultimates get the Sport poly roof. While Sports and Premiums have Sachs ZF twin-tube shocks, Ultimates upgrade to Fox 2.0 Podium X shocks.

POLARIS RZR TRAIL 900 PREMIUM
A makeover for 2021 1/2 gave all Trails and 60-inch Trail S’ a front fascia, LED accent lights, a dash, hood, fenders and ROPS cage with rear-end protection from the RZR Turbo S. The Sports have steel wheels and halogen headlights, while Premium and Ultimate Trails have aluminum rims and blacked-out LED headlights.

 

HOW DOES COST COMPARE?

The 50-inch Trail Sport is $14,499. The Premium is $16,999, and the Ultimate is $18,999. The Trail 570 starts at $11,999. The Trail S Sport is $16,699. The Premium is $19,199, and the Ultimate is $20,999. Can-Am’s 50-inch, 62-horsepower Maverick Trail 700 starts at $12,799, and the 100-horsepower Trail 1000 DPS starts at $16,099. The CFMoto 800 Trail starts at $11,399.

HOW FAST IS THE PROSTAR 900?

Plenty quick! The Trails have the strongest version of the 875cc ProStar twin with 93mm pistons, a short 64.4mm stroke, 10.6:1 compression, and a 46mm EFI throttle body feeding two intake valves. Turn-to-turn acceleration is impressive, as the Trail Ultimate carries 17.29 pounds per horsepower. It’s not quite as strong as the Trail S Ultimate with 13.6 pounds per horsepower, but it’s exciting. The ERX Park woods course was too tight to top it out in High, but it should approach 70 mph flat out. Low is good for 39 mph.

 

POLARIS RZR TRAIL 900 PREMIUM
Curved half doors on the Polaris RZR Trail 900 Premium provide plenty of elbow room and security, and a new seal keeps dirt and dust out. The bolstered seats are super comfortable and secure with thick padding. The smaller D-shaped steering wheel is also comfortable, with variable-assist EPS providing nimble turning with little effort.

 

WHAT ABOUT THE CVT/AWD DELIVERY?

It’s top-shelf. The AWD system aids handling by staying in 2WD until the rear tires spin. Then it automatically goes into 4WD and pulls out of slides. This really helps the car rotate in tight woods and climb hills, as does the Engine Braking System. The CVT clutch and EFI engine map are well tuned and matched for spirited acceleration and control, and the Versa-Trak unlocking rear diff also helps it carve tight turns and be gentle on turf. Our only complaint is that the range selector is not gated for more positive shifts, but Park mode is handy.

POLARIS RZR TRAIL 900 PREMIUM
A makeover for 2021 1/2 gave all Trails and 60-inch Trail S’ a front fascia, LED accent lights, a dash, hood, fenders and ROPS cage with rear-end protection from the RZR Turbo S. The Sports have steel wheels and halogen headlights, while Premium and Ultimate Trails have aluminum rims and blacked-out LED headlights.

 

HOW DOES THE TRAIL HANDLE?

It’s very agile. With a 79-inch wheelbase, the Trail rips through tight woods, and the AWD and EBS set up drifts into turns so the Trail pulls through exits like no other RZR. Dual torsion bars fight body roll and give the driver confidence on off-camber turns. It tracks well in deep sand ruts and is pretty stable at speed, as long as the whoops aren’t too big.

HOW ABOUT THE SUSPENSION?

It’s great for woods work. The Premium’s ZF Sachs shocks are sprung and damped well for roots, rocks and ruts, and double A-arms at all four corners have 10 inches of independent travel. The Ultimate’s Fox 2.0 Podium X shocks are also well tuned for the square hits encountered in the forest and offer more bottoming resistance than the ZF Sachs HPGs.

POLARIS RZR TRAIL 900 PREMIUM
A new dash from the Turbo S adds storage options and has blanks for accessory switches. The Ultimate adds Ride Command, featuring a 7-inch interactive screen with GPS/Group Ride, data, audio, Bluetooth connection and backup camera screens.

 

HOW STRONG ARE THE BRAKES?

Really strong. Dual-piston hydraulic calipers squeeze large rotors via braided stainless-steel brake lines, and they’re backed up by the Engine Braking System CVT helix, which helps set up drifts into corners.

WHERE IS THE TRAIL HAPPIEST?

In full Derby mode. It’s a great woods machine, and the unlocking rear diff and EBS help it bend around mountain switchbacks. 

POLARIS RZR TRAIL 900 PREMIUM
Under-hood storage is an option, and an accessory bus provides power for lighting, radios, a winch and more.

 

WHAT ABOUT TRAIL COMFORT?

It doesn’t get any better than this in a 50-inch trail machine. The interior is the same as the Trail S tested in February’s issue, and the 2021 1/2  remodel gave it more elbow room, with the half doors providing more confidence and security. The bolstered seats and sitting position are super comfortable, and the smaller D-shaped steering wheel is also very comfortable with over-molding and thumb nubs. The driver’s seat adjusts without tools, and the passenger seat can be adjusted with tools. The passenger T-bar is very comfortable and adjustable as well. The new dash has a center compartment with a lid for cell phones and devices, and the cubby with rubber netting above the T-bar is also handy. The roof is also a great standard feature on the Ultimate; it channels rain to keep water out of the cabin. We wish the Trail had T-rail-adjustable seat belts, though. 

Bodywork is identical to the 60-inch Trail S models for a roomy cockpit, but the Trails have shorter A-arms and shocks for 50-inch width and 10 inches of travel. Dual-piston hydraulic calipers stop all four wheels, and front tires are 26×8-12 PXTs. Rears are 26×9-12.

 

WHAT’S OUR FINAL ANSWER?

We shot out the 2018 RZR and Maverick Trails in the October 2018 issue, and most of our test pilots preferred the RZR, which had a more cramped cockpit but was quicker and more agile. With the 2021 1/2 makeover, Polaris erased any comfort advantage the Can-Am Trail had over the old RZR Trail. It’s as agile as a mountain goat, but it won’t eat into your gas budget, because the Trail 900 runs on 87-octane gas. It’s quick and fun for aggressive driving, yet it’s super comfortable for leisurely rides on 50-inch trails. It does everything very well. Owners of the original RZR 800 looking to upgrade can’t go wrong with the 2022 Trail Sport, Premium or Ultimate, which adds Ride Command and all of its great features, including Group Ride and audio control.

RATINGS

MOTOR/TRANNY

Overall power 5

Low 5

Mid 5

Top 5

Throttle response 5

Idling smoothness 5

Shifting/tranny 4

HANDLING AND CHASSIS

Overall handling 5

Turning precision 5

Turning stability 5

Powersliding 5

Steering ease 5

Off-cambers 5

High-speed stability 5

Jumping 5

Front brakes 5

Rear brakes 5

Front suspension 5

Rear suspension 5

Low-speed ride plushness 5

High-speed bump control 5

Ground clearance 5

Undercarriage protection 5

Traction 5

Hill-climbing 5

Downhilling 4

Water/mud 5

Rock hounding 5

RIDER COMFORT AND CONVENIENCE

Overall ease of use 5

Startup ease 5

Seat comfort .5

Vibration 5

Wheel/seat/footrest 5

Mud/water protection 5

Air filter access 5

Control ease 5

Range selection switch 4

Storage box size 5

Storage box access 5

Rear bed space 3

OVERALL

Overall design 5

Fit and finish 5

Overall sport 5

Overall utility 3

Overall rating 5

SPECS

2022 POLARIS RZR TRAIL 900 ENGINE/TRANSMISSION

Engine type Liquid-cooled, 8-valve, DOHC 

4-stroke twin

Displacement 875cc

Bore x stroke 93mm x 64.4mm (x2)

Compression ratio 10.6:1

Lubrication system Wet sump

Additional cooling Auto fan

Induction 46mm EFI

Starting/back-up Electric/none 

Starting procedure Turn ignition switch

Air filter:

  Type Paper pleat

  Access Tool-less, undo four clasps

Transmission Dual-range CVT w/ reverse

Reverse procedure Move range selector to “R”

Drive system Selectable 2WD/4WD w/auto diff-lock 

Final drives Shafts

DIMENSIONS/CAPACITIES/WEIGHTS

Fuel capacity 9.5 gal.

Wheelbase 79.0”

Overall length/width/height 110.9”/50”/67.9”

Ground clearance 11.0”

Claimed dry weight 1,238 lb.; Ultimate 1,297 lb.

Bed weight limit 300 lb.

Hitch 1.25” receiver

Towing limit 1,500 lb.

ROLLING CHASSIS

Frame Steel round tube

Suspension/wheel travel:

  Front Dual A-arm w/ prel./comp.-adj. 2.0 WER 

shocks/12.25”

  Rear Dual A-arm w/ prel./comp.-adj. 2.0 WER 

shocks/13.2”

Brakes/actuation:

  Front Hydraulic discs/left-side pedal

  Rear Hydraulic discs/left-side pedal

Parking Lever on console

Tires:

  Front AT 27x9R12 Trailmaster A/T

  Rear AT 27x11R12 Trailmaster A/T

ELECTRICAL

DC outlet Console

Lighting:

  Front 2 LED hi/lo headlights

  Rear Dual LED brake/taillights

DETAILS

Instrumentation Speed/odo/trip/hour/rpm/fuel/

gear/clock/2WD-4WD

Colors Sport White Lightning, Premium Polaris Blue, 

Ultimate Ghost Grey 

Minimum recommended operator age 16

Suggested retail price Sport $14,499; 

Premium $16,999, Ultimate $18,999

Contact Polaris, (800) POLARIS

 

You might also like

Comments are closed.