SUPERATV FLIP-UP/-DOWN WINDSHIELDS

WHAT IT IS: SUPERATV FLIP-UP/-DOWN WINDSHIELDS

This month we are taking a look at two SuperATV Flip-up/-down windshields. A flip-up windshield we mounted on a Polaris RZR Turbo S, and the second is a flip-down-style windshield we mounted on a Polaris RZR Pro XP.

SUPERATV FLIP-UP/-DOWN WINDSHIELDS
When the windshield is flipped up, the lower stationary portion acts as a wind deflector. We torture-tested both windshields at 55 mph in deep whoops, and they both held up to the abuse perfectly.

CONSTRUCTION:

Both windshields are made from 1/4-inch, scratch-resistant polycarbonate, which SuperATV claims is 25 times stronger than acrylic (think cheap Amazon/E Bay windshields) and 250 times stronger than glass. Furthermore, they use an XR Optic hard coating to maximize performance and minimize blemishes.

SUPERATV FLIP-UP/-DOWN WINDSHIELDS
In the downward position, the front two Velcro straps are used to keep the windshield down. It stays in place well with zero vibration up to a top speed of 85 mph. At this speed, the window actually gets pushed down and very little air goes underneath.
We mounted SuperATV’s flip-up windshield on a Polaris RZR Turbo S. It took about 30 minutes longer to install and cost $120 more. Both issues were worth it, as we liked to “flip up” better.

COMPARISON:

The big difference between the two products is their operation. The flip-up windshield can be deployed and retracted while you are still seated. You can also “crack” the window and let just a little bit of air through by turning the handle 90 degrees, moving the windshield forward an inch, then securing it slightly open. When open, the lower portion acts as a deflector to direct wind up a bit, but it’s not as good as a true half windshield. The same goes for the flip-down version; it doesn’t deflect a lot of wind, but it does deflect some.

At speed, both stay in their intended position. Even after 100 miles of testing, the struts are holding up the Turbo S windshield, and the straps do a good job keeping the windshield secured to the hood.

To deploy the flip-up windshield, you grab the handle at the lower center. You can also position it slightly open to allow just a little airflow in. We wish the visor portion was blacked out to reduce sun glare. After this test, we painted it.
Our only complaint was a minor one. In the down position, the windshield didn’t allow our Ride Command antenna to stick up straight. The Ride Command seemed to work fine regardless.

VERDICT:

We liked the price and ease of installation better on the flip-down windshield, but having the ability to operate and “crack” open the windshield on the flip-up windshield was a big plus. Furthermore, we weren’t expecting the flip-up windshield to work well at high speeds or stay up in rough terrain—and it does. It does everything right and only takes a half hour more to install, so if we had to pick a favorite, we would choose to flip up.

 

CONTACT: www.superatv.com, (855) 743-3427

RATING: ★★★★★

PRICE: $449, Turbo S flip-up; $369, Pro XP flip-down; other machines range from $295–$695

See UTV Action’s Windshield Buyer’s Guide here: UTV WINDSHIELD BUYER’S GUIDE | UTV Action Magazine

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